Research

The Centre for Research on Families, Life Course and Generations has an international reputation for research excellence and for developing cutting edge research methods.  Much of our research engages with socio-economic inequalities and the interplay of social experience and large scale social change, particularly in areas relating to youth, schooling, vocational and higher education, education to labour market transitions, parenting and family life, inter-generational relationships, sex and relationship education, and autism across the life course. We hold expertise in diverse methodological approaches and are particularly well known for shaping UK research methods infrastructure in the area of qualitative longitudinal research and qualitative data archiving, notably through ESRC Timescapes. FLaG also offers a hub for inter-disciplinary events and collaborations, building on the research activities and interests of academics in different departments across the University of Leeds. We have close links with the Inequalities Research Network. Examples of our research projects are listed below.

 

Current and recent research projects

As well as involvement in funded projects we are developing work in a number of connected areas relating to 14-19, graduate transitions, youth in comparative perspective
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The study explored parents’ experiences of raising children in contemporary Britain, their expectations for their children’s futures and their practices and orientations.
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Dr Sharon Elley is developing research into experiences of autism, institutional policy and practice and related barriers and pathways in education and employment.
Dr Kim Allen is involved in the project: The role of celebrity in young people's classed and gendered aspirations, and her related book will be published by Bloomsbury in 2018
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Dr Kahryn Hughes is involved in this CRUK funded project with colleagues at the University of Leicester
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Dr Daniel Edmiston is currently developing a project to examine emerging social divisions of public welfare in a changing labour market and its implications for intergenerational inequality.